How to Post a Job on Harri

2016 has been a very busy year for the Harri Team! We have been working hard over the past few months for you to source, hire and manage your staff as efficiently as possible. So far, we have made some great strides in the process and a more seamless experience for you recruit top talent through our system.  It all begins with a job post, the gateway into your company's culture and the opportunity to join your team! 

A Step-by-Step Guide to Post a Job:

1) Once on our homepage, choose "Find Talent", then on the top right-hand corner go to "Dashboard" 

2) Once on your Dashboard choose the "Hiring" tile (third from the left)

3) Choose "Post a Job" from the "I Want To" drop down menu.  Add the respective restaurant or brand where the job is being posted. 

4) Use the drop down menu to add the position or choose a unique title.  Then add years of Experience required, Skills, Availability, Start time, Compensation, and Job Description.  Choose to schedule an open call (or not) and add first interview question, then you may to post immediately or schedule it for later. 

5)  Choose to send over job description/post to various members of your team (HR, Managers) for approval or to share.  You may choose to save the job post as a draft or a template for future use.  If you have enough credits allotted to your account then you can "Publish Job" or "Save Draft" and "Buy More Credits".  Each job posting is $29/each, and expires after 29 days or if you have our Total Talent Solution then you have unlimited job postings in your package.  

What Makes Us Different:

There will always be a need for employees in the hospitality industry.  No one has the patience to post the same job, over and over again.  This is where Harri makes it easy for you.   Our system allows you to save job position descriptions and skills/requirements as a template for quick one-click reposting.  

50% of Quick Service Restaurant Jobs Filled By First-Time or Promoted Workers

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Restaurants continued to add jobs at a steady pace in February, and a sizable proportion of these job openings are being filled by either new entrants to the workforce or people being promoted from other positions within the same business, according to the NRA’s Chief Economist Bruce Grindy. His Economist’s Notebook commentary and analysis appears regularly on Restaurant.org and Restaurant TrendMapper.

The national labor market continued to expand at a moderate pace in February, according to figures released today by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The economy added a net 242,000 jobs on a seasonally-adjusted basis in February, which is generally on par with the average gains during the last six months. 

The restaurant industry remains one of the steadiest contributors to private-sector growth, with the 40,200 net new jobs added in February representing the ninth consecutive month with gains of at least 20,000 positions. 

While the industry added middle class jobs at a rate four times stronger than the overall economy in recent years, it also maintained its role as the training ground for America’s workforce. 

For new entrants to the labor force, the restaurant industry is one of the most common landing spots. In fact, roughly one-third of all U.S. adults say their first employment experience was in the restaurant and foodservice industry. 

According to new NRA research that appears in the 2016 Restaurant Industry Forecast, restaurant operators reported that roughly one in five of their job openings in 2015 were filled by people for whom this was the first regular job that they have ever had.

The limited-service segment was the most likely to hire new workers, with 30 percent of quickservice openings and 25 percent of fast-casual job openings going to people getting their first work experience. 

Approximately one in six jobs at family-dining and casual-dining restaurants went to first-time workers in 2015, while eight percent of openings in the fine-dining segment were filled by new entrants to the workforce.

In addition to providing employment opportunities for first-time workers, many jobs are also filled by people advancing from other positions within a restaurant, typically because of the on-the-job training and knowledge of the business that they obtain from those roles. 

In 2015, approximately one in five job openings were filled by people who were promoted from other jobs within the same restaurant business. This trend was strikingly similar across each of the five major segments, with the fast-casual segment only slightly ahead of the others at 23 percent.

All told, roughly one-half of limited-service restaurant job openings in 2015 were filled by either new entrants to the workforce or people being promoted from other positions within the same restaurant.

(via National Restaurant Association)

5 Reasons The Restaurant Industry Is In Good Shape

The restaurant industry started the year off weak, at least based on sales indices. Black Box Intelligence said same-store sales fell 0.8 percent for the month. According to MillerPulse, same-store sales increased 1 percent. Both were the weakest figures in years.

But both numbers mask what was, in reality, a good month for the industry and what could be the start of a profitable year. Here’s why:

The two-year trend is still strong. Both MillerPulse and Black Box were comparing themselves to a January 2015 that was the strongest month in recent years thanks to a run of stupid good weather. So sure, January’s sales weren’t quite as good as the previous year, they were still quite good on a two-year basis. MillerPulse’s two-year same-store sales trend of 6.3 percent was the strongest for that index in two years. For Black Box, the two-year trend is 5.3 percent. Two-year trend numbers factor out one-time events like weather that can influence a single year’s same-store sales.

Overall sales were stronger. According to recent federal data, sales at food services and drinking places increased 6.1 percent in January, to $53.5 billion. Federal data tracks all sales, rather than same-store sales, and so it can account for increases in sales from new units as well as independents. Overall retail sales excluding auto sales, by comparison, increased just 2.5 percent. Sales at grocery stores, 2.3 percent.

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Restaurant owners are hiring. This is the best indication of an industry still in expansion mode. Restaurateurs hired 46,700 workers in January, or close to one out of every three jobs the economy created in the month. Over the past year, the industry has added more than 380,000 jobs. What’s the point of adding workers if you don’t think your business will need the added labor?

Gas prices are still ridiculously low. Gas prices averaged $1.70 per gallon as of Tuesday, according to AAA. While that’s a bit higher than it was a week ago, it’s still 60 cents per gallon cheaper than a year ago. Gas prices are expected to be low for some time, as long as there remains a glut in oil, putting money in the pockets of more consumers. When consumers get more money, they really want to spend it on dining out.

Food costs are coming down. These additional sales are coming as beef costs finally join other commodities in deflating. Lower prices for beef, pork and chicken should make for a more profitable industry in 2016. Indeed, Texas Roadhouse executives said on the company’s earnings call Monday that they expect higher margins this year thanks to more sales and lower food costs.

None of this is to say that there aren’t challenges in the industry. But barring some major calamity, it appears this could be the best year for restaurants since the start of the Great Recession.

(via Nation's Restaurant News)

High Projections for Restaurant Job Growth in 2016

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Restaurant job growth is projected to outpace the overall economy in 2016, and the industry will add more than 300,000 jobs for the sixth consecutive calendar year, according to the NRA’s Chief Economist Bruce Grindy. His Economist’s Notebookcommentary and analysis appears regularly on Restaurant.org and Restaurant TrendMapper.

The restaurant industry continues to be one of the strongest job creators in the economy, with industry job growth outpacing the overall economy for the 16th consecutive year in 2015. Eating and drinking places, the primary component of the restaurant industry accounting for three-fourths of the total restaurant and foodservice workforce, added jobs at a 3.2 percent rate in 2015. This was more than a full percentage point above the 2.1 percent gain in total U.S. employment.

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The industry’s 2015 gain marked the fourth consecutive year with job growth of at least 3 percent, the longest streak since the mid-1980s. With job growth outstripping the overall economy in each of the last 16 years, the eating-and-drinking-place sector saw its employment level jump by 38 percent. In contrast, the total number of jobs in the economy increased by only 10 percent during the same period.

Within the industry, job growth remained broad-based in 2015, with most of the major segments posting solid gains. The snack-and-nonalcoholic-beverage-bar segment – which includes concepts like coffee, doughnut and ice cream shops – led the way with a robust 6.5 percent employment gain in 2015, the fourth consecutive year with growth above 5 percent.

The quickservice segment added jobs at a 3.4 percent rate in 2015, while the tableservice segment expanded payrolls at a 3.3 percent pace.

Looking ahead, the NRA expects eating and drinking places to add jobs at a 3.0 percent rate in 2016, which will represent the fifth consecutive year in which the restaurant industry registered job growth of at least 3 percent. In comparison, the overall economy hasn’t posted job growth of 3 percent since 1994.

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The projected 2016 increase will also represent the sixth consecutive calendar year in which restaurants added more than 300,000 jobs.

For the national labor market, 2015 was the strongest year yet in the aftermath of the Great Recession. The national economy added a net 2.9 million jobs on an annual basis in 2015, and the 2.1 percent employment increase was the strongest gain in 15 years.

Although the economy is expected to build on 2015’s positive performance, growth will likely be somewhat slower in 2016. The NRA projects total U.S. employment to increase 1.8 percent in 2016, down slightly from the 2.1 percent gain posted in 2015.

(via National Restaurant Association)

Women and Minority-Owned Restaurants Growing Sharply

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Women-owned and minority-owned restaurant businesses grew at rates well above their cohorts in the overall economy in recent years, according to the NRA’s Chief Economist Bruce Grindy. His Economist’s Notebook commentary and analysis appears regularly on Restaurant.org and Restaurant TrendMapper.

In addition to providing employment opportunities for both first-time and experienced workers, the restaurant industry offers a path to entrepreneurship that no other industry can match. In fact, eight in 10 restaurant owners say their first job in the restaurant industry was an entry-level position, according to research by the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation.

With few barriers to entry, the restaurant industry provides ownership opportunities to people of all backgrounds. This was on full display during the challenging economic environment in recent years, when women-owned and minority-owned restaurant businesses grew at rates well above their cohorts in the overall economy.

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Between 2007 and 2012 (most recent data available), the number of women-owned restaurant businesses jumped 40 percent, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau. During the same 5-year period, the number of women-owned businesses in the overall economy rose 27 percent.

As a result of these strong gains, 33 percent of restaurant businesses are majority-owned by women – up from 26 percent in 2007. Another 15 percent of restaurant businesses are equally-owned by women and men.

Minority-owned restaurant businesses also rose sharply in recent years. The number of Hispanic-owned restaurant businesses soared 51 percent between 2007 and 2012, while black- or African-American-owned restaurants jumped 49 percent. Both were above their corresponding growth rates in the overall economy.

The number of Asian-owned restaurant businesses increased 18 percent between 2007 and 2012, which was slightly below the 24 percent increase in the overall economy.

As a result of the steady growth in recent years, fully four in 10 restaurant businesses are majority-owned by minorities. In the overall economy, 29 percent of businesses are owned by minorities.

(via National Restaurant Association)